Skip to content

Data Types

DataFrame

A DataFrame represents a logical set of rows with the same named columns, similar to a Pandas DataFrame or Spark DataFrame.

You can create a dataframe from sql:

python
from greptime import PyDataFrame, col
@copr(returns = ["value"])
def query_numbers() -> vector[f64]:
    df = PyDataFrame.from_sql("select number from numbers")
    return df.filter(col('number') <= 5).collect()[0]
from greptime import PyDataFrame, col
@copr(returns = ["value"])
def query_numbers() -> vector[f64]:
    df = PyDataFrame.from_sql("select number from numbers")
    return df.filter(col('number') <= 5).collect()[0]

It's the same as select number from numbers where number <=5, but uses dataframe API.

In fact, the coprocessor's dataframe API is a wrapper of Apache Datafusion DataFrame API. Please refer to API document to get the full DataFrame API.

Vector

The vector is the major data type in Coprocessor, it's a vector of values in the same type. Usually, it comes from extracting a column from the query result, but you can also construct it in the python script.

The vector is like the array type in the programming language, Array in Apache Arrow or NDArray in NumPy.

Vector Types

The Coprocessor Engine supports the following vector types:

TypeDescription
vector[str]The string type
vector[bool]The boolean type
vector[u8]The 8-bit unsigned integer type
vector[u16]The 16-bit unsigned integer type
vector[u32]The 32-bit unsigned integer type
vector[u64]The 64-bit unsigned integer type
vector[i8]The 8-bit signed integer type
vector[i16]The 16-bit signed integer type
vector[i32]The 32-bit signed integer type
vector[i64]The 64-bit signed integer type
vector[f32]The 32-bit floating point type
vector[f64]The 64-bit floating point type
vector[none]The any type

As we see in Hello, world, we can define the return vector types for the coprocessor if we want to use it as SQL UDF. Otherwise, we can ignore the return vector types declaration:

python
@coprocessor(returns=['msg'])
def hello() -> vector[str]:
   return "hello, GreptimeDB"
@coprocessor(returns=['msg'])
def hello() -> vector[str]:
   return "hello, GreptimeDB"

The Coprocessor Engine will infer the return vector types by the result. But without the declaration, we can't call it in SQL except by HTTP API.

Construct a vector

We have already seen the example that extracting vectors from the query result by executing the sql attribute in @coprocessor in Query Data.

We can create a vector from literals:

python
@copr(returns=["value"])
def answer() -> vector[i64]:
    return 42
@copr(returns=["value"])
def answer() -> vector[i64]:
    return 42

The result 42 will be wrapped as a one-element vector of vector[i64].

sql
mysql> select answer();
+----------+
| answer() |
+----------+
|       42 |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)
mysql> select answer();
+----------+
| answer() |
+----------+
|       42 |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

We can create a vector from a python list:

python
from greptime import vector

@copr(returns=["value"])
def answer() -> vector[i64]:
    return vector([42, 43, 44])
from greptime import vector

@copr(returns=["value"])
def answer() -> vector[i64]:
    return vector([42, 43, 44])

The greptime is a built-in module, please refer to API Document.

sql
mysql> select answer();
+----------+
| answer() |
+----------+
|       42 |
|       43 |
|       44 |
+----------+
3 rows in set (0.02 sec)
mysql> select answer();
+----------+
| answer() |
+----------+
|       42 |
|       43 |
|       44 |
+----------+
3 rows in set (0.02 sec)

In fact, the vector function can create a vector from any iterable object in python. But it requires all the element types must be the same, and it chooses the first element's type as its vector type.

Vector operations

The vector supports a lot of operations:

  1. Basic arithmetic operators are supported, including +, -, *, /.
  2. Basic logic operations are supported, including &, |, ~.
  3. Basic comparison operation including>, <, >=, <=, ==, != are supported too.

Note: Here we override bitwise and &, bitwise or |, bitwise not ~ logical operator because Python doesn't support logical operator override(You can't override and or not). PEP335 made a proposal and was eventually rejected. But bitwise operators have higher precedence than comparison operators, so remember to use a pair of parentheses to make sure the result is what you want. i.e. if you want to filter a vector that's between 0 and 100, you should use (vector[i32] >= 0) & (vector[i32] <= 100) not vector[i32] >= 0 & vector[i32] <= 100. The latter one will be evaluated as vector[i32] >= (0 & vector[i32]) <= 100.

For example, you can plus two vectors directly:

python
@copr(args=["n1", "n2"],
      returns=["value"],
      sql="select number as n1,number as n2 from numbers limit 5")
def add_vectors(n1, n2) -> vector[i32]:
    return n1 + n2
@copr(args=["n1", "n2"],
      returns=["value"],
      sql="select number as n1,number as n2 from numbers limit 5")
def add_vectors(n1, n2) -> vector[i32]:
    return n1 + n2

Or do a comparison with a bool array in a Numpy way:

python
from greptime import vector

@copr(returns=["value"])
def compare() -> vector[bool]:
    # This returns a vector([False, False, True])
    return vector([1.0, 2.0, 3.0]) > 2.0
from greptime import vector

@copr(returns=["value"])
def compare() -> vector[bool]:
    # This returns a vector([False, False, True])
    return vector([1.0, 2.0, 3.0]) > 2.0

And using the boolean array indexing:

python
from greptime import vector

@copr(returns=["value"])
def boolean_array() -> vector[f64]:
    v = vector([1.0, 2.0, 3.0])
    # This returns a vector([2.0])
    return v[(v > 1) & (v< 3)]
from greptime import vector

@copr(returns=["value"])
def boolean_array() -> vector[f64]:
    v = vector([1.0, 2.0, 3.0])
    # This returns a vector([2.0])
    return v[(v > 1) & (v< 3)]

Comparison between two vectors is also supported:

python
from greptime import vector

@copr(returns=["value"])
def compare_vectors() -> vector[bool]:
    # This returns a vector([False, False, True])
    return vector([1.0, 2.0, 3.0]) > vector([1.0, 2.0, 2.0])
from greptime import vector

@copr(returns=["value"])
def compare_vectors() -> vector[bool]:
    # This returns a vector([False, False, True])
    return vector([1.0, 2.0, 3.0]) > vector([1.0, 2.0, 2.0])

Using an indexed bool array to select elements from a vector:

python
from greptime import vector

@copr(returns=["value"])
def select_elements() -> (vector[f64]):
    a = vector([1.0, 2.0, 3.0])
    # This returns a vector([2.0, 3.0])
    return a[a>=2.0]
from greptime import vector

@copr(returns=["value"])
def select_elements() -> (vector[f64]):
    a = vector([1.0, 2.0, 3.0])
    # This returns a vector([2.0, 3.0])
    return a[a>=2.0]

Of course, we can use list comprehension to construct a new vector:

python
from greptime import vector

@copr(returns=["value"])
def list_comprehension() -> (vector[f64]):
    a = vector([1.0, 2.0, 3.0])
    # This returns a vector([3.0, 4.0])
    return [x+1 for x in a if a >= 2.0]
from greptime import vector

@copr(returns=["value"])
def list_comprehension() -> (vector[f64]):
    a = vector([1.0, 2.0, 3.0])
    # This returns a vector([3.0, 4.0])
    return [x+1 for x in a if a >= 2.0]